Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Bubble wrap is the new black.

Maybe not, but plastic shopping bags, aluminum cans, old newspapers and orange construction fencing were just some of the hottest materials on the runway at this year’s Trash 2 Trends fashion show.

Presented at SeaWorld Orlando’s Ports of Call on Saturday night, the sold-out event featured more than 30 designers from across the region who accepted the challenge to create outfits using materials typically found in the recycling bin.

The annual event is a fundraiser for Keep Orlando Beautiful, a 20-year-old nonprofit led by Jody Buyas whose mission is to make Orlando a healthier, safer and more livable and sustainable community. Last year’s Trash 2 Trends event raised more than $17,000 for community projects such as tree plantings and the installation of recycling bins in city parks. (The total amount of money raised at this year’s event won’t be available until later this week.)

EDIT: Keep Orlando Beautiful raised $22,000 (net) from this event. 

Now in its fourth year, the Trash 2 Trends show gives Orlando designers an opportunity to think outside the cardboard box and impress a team of judges who give out awards for “Top Design,” “Most Wearable, “Best Use of Material” and “Avant Garde.” This year’s judges included Orlando City Commissioner Patty Sheehan, Downtown Arts District Executive Director Barbara Hartley, Maxine’s On Shine owner Maxine Earhart and local designer Marcy Singhaus.

At Saturday’s show, Red Bull cans became a corset. Old paint swatches stitched together created a long, flowing dress. Men’s ties destined for the garbage bin were constructed into a kilt. Wine corks were tailored into a headdress.  The guts of numerous VHS tapes shined as one model glided down the runway. In other words, if something was headed to the landfill, there’s a possibility it could have had a second life at Trash 2 Trends.

Designer Kyana Wilborn, of Orlando, spent more than 80 hours creating a design she called “Color of Bloom.” Using green, blue, pink, white, black and red plastic bags, Wilborn crocheted and hand-stitched a floral mini dress. Wilborn, who works at Walt Disney World, taught herself to crochet using YouTube videos to make the 1970-inspired dress, which won the award for “Most Wearable.”

While the materials for the designs varied, each of the designers shared at least one thing in common: dedication to their work. Collectively, the Trash 2 Trends participants spent thousands of hours making their fashions.

It took designer Nancy Alonso, of Altamonte Springs, more than three months to collect materials and create the peacock-inspired piece she called “True Colors.” A nurse at Florida Hospital, Alonso used rolled newspapers, broken compact discs, shattered mirrors, medicine bottle caps and paper clips to construct the design.

The multi-colored dress with movable plumage wowed the judges enough to give Alonso the “Top Design” award.

Alonso also won the “People’s Choice” award.

 

  

2017 Trash 2 Trends Awards

Best Use of Materials – “Love Conquers Hate” by Meghan Moreno

Avant Garde – “Uncorked” by Christina Woodman

Most Wearable – “Color of Bloom” by Kyana Wilborn

Top Design and People’s Choice – “True Colors” by Nancy Alonso

 

5H1A6952
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
5H1A6963
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

20170204_202138

DSC_9068

DSC_9132

Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

20170204_201735

Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

DSC_9140

20170204_202510

20170204_202531

Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

DSC_9150

20170204_201825

Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

20170204_204524

Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography
Photo by Jorge Suarez Photography

20170204_220607

20170204_221128

20170204_220650

20170204_220741

20170204_220845

10 COMMENTS

  1. I actually walked in a trash clothing fashion show recently, it was really cool to see how artistic people can be with literal trash.

Have something to say? Type it below. Holding back can give you pimples.