Home Topics Art and Culture New exhibit shares stories of Pride, Prejudice and Protest over five decades

New exhibit shares stories of Pride, Prejudice and Protest over five decades

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A new exhibit reflecting the progress and setbacks of Central Florida’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community over five decades of change will be on display at the Orange County Regional History Center from October 1, 2016 – January 26, 2017.

The exhibit, titled Pride, Prejudice & Protest: The GLBT History of Greater Orlando, is from the collection of the nonprofit GLBT History Museum of Central Florida.

Admission is free on Saturday, October 8, to coincide with Orlando’s annual Come Out with Pride festival.

Elements in the exhibit include “Forty Years of the Parliament House,” a video history about how a 1960s-era motel became a GLBT institution in Orlando and the Southeast, a panel from the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt (in total, the largest piece of community folk art in the world), historical publications by and for the community, and a section on the depiction of the community in the media and popular culture.

To learn more about the GLBT History Museum of Central Florida, visit glbthistorymuseum.com. For more about the History Center, visit thehistorycenter.org.

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Brendan O'Connorhttps://www.brendanoconnor.me/
Editor in Chief of Bungalower.com

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A new exhibit reflecting the progress and setbacks of Central Florida’s gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community over five decades of change will be on display at the Orange County Regional History Center from October 1, 2016 – January 26, 2017.

The exhibit, titled Pride, Prejudice & Protest: The GLBT History of Greater Orlando, is from the collection of the nonprofit GLBT History Museum of Central Florida.

Admission is free on Saturday, October 8, to coincide with Orlando’s annual Come Out with Pride festival.

Elements in the exhibit include “Forty Years of the Parliament House,” a video history about how a 1960s-era motel became a GLBT institution in Orlando and the Southeast, a panel from the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt (in total, the largest piece of community folk art in the world), historical publications by and for the community, and a section on the depiction of the community in the media and popular culture.

To learn more about the GLBT History Museum of Central Florida, visit glbthistorymuseum.com. For more about the History Center, visit thehistorycenter.org.