Home Topics History Bunga-Map: Take an informative walk through the Greenwood Cemetery

Bunga-Map: Take an informative walk through the Greenwood Cemetery

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Cemeteries are essentially outdoor museums, and in the face of a pandemic and social distancing, they have the added context of reminding us all that life is temporary.

Cemeteries are places of history, of remembrance, of mourning individuals and collective histories of people who have impacted where we choose to live. The City of Orlando has treated its only public cemetery, Greenwood Cemetery, as such for years, hosting monthly moonlit walking tours where guests are regaled with colorful stories of Orlandoans come and gone. It also has acquired a number of sculptures over the years that were removed from more public venues like the Confederate Johnny Reb statue or the original Sperry Fountain.

The Moonlight Walking Tour takes you along a two-mile jaunt in the 100-acre cemetery, usually led by former Sexton Don Price. But in the days of social distancing, you may prefer a solitary stroll versus a group affair so we’ve come up with the following interactive map, complete with photos (where we could find them) and notes on some remarkable individuals who are buried there.

Simply pull out your phone, click on the markers, and get a little 411 on the person behind the headstone. The information gathered for this map was gleaned from documents at the Orange County Regional History Center, various online resources, and Greenwood by Steve Rajtar by way of the West Oaks Branch Library and Genealogy Center. This is not a comprehensive account of every person buried in the cemetery, but rather a snippet of some individuals who really jumped out at us.

Please visit these graves with respect and be mindful of uneven ground. Do not touch the gravestones and be aware that some of them have fallen into disrepair.

This map will continue to evolve as we find out more information on the people who are laid here to rest.

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Brendan O'Connorhttps://www.brendanoconnor.me/
Editor in Chief of Bungalower.com

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Cemeteries are essentially outdoor museums, and in the face of a pandemic and social distancing, they have the added context of reminding us all that life is temporary.

Cemeteries are places of history, of remembrance, of mourning individuals and collective histories of people who have impacted where we choose to live. The City of Orlando has treated its only public cemetery, Greenwood Cemetery, as such for years, hosting monthly moonlit walking tours where guests are regaled with colorful stories of Orlandoans come and gone. It also has acquired a number of sculptures over the years that were removed from more public venues like the Confederate Johnny Reb statue or the original Sperry Fountain.

The Moonlight Walking Tour takes you along a two-mile jaunt in the 100-acre cemetery, usually led by former Sexton Don Price. But in the days of social distancing, you may prefer a solitary stroll versus a group affair so we’ve come up with the following interactive map, complete with photos (where we could find them) and notes on some remarkable individuals who are buried there.

Simply pull out your phone, click on the markers, and get a little 411 on the person behind the headstone. The information gathered for this map was gleaned from documents at the Orange County Regional History Center, various online resources, and Greenwood by Steve Rajtar by way of the West Oaks Branch Library and Genealogy Center. This is not a comprehensive account of every person buried in the cemetery, but rather a snippet of some individuals who really jumped out at us.

Please visit these graves with respect and be mindful of uneven ground. Do not touch the gravestones and be aware that some of them have fallen into disrepair.

This map will continue to evolve as we find out more information on the people who are laid here to rest.