Home Topics Architecture City considering two bids for Colonial Pedestrian Overpass project

City considering two bids for Colonial Pedestrian Overpass project

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Southland bid graphic
EDIT: City Council voted to approve the Advisory Committee’s ranking and approved the CPO to execute a contract with Southland Construction, Inc., in the amount of $8.714M at the May 9 Council Meeting. 
Two companies have submitted design bids in response to the City of Orlando’s search for designs for the Colonial Pedestrian Overpass project – Southland Construction (Website) and Gibbs & Registry (Website).
The City will be considering the applications at the May 9 City Council meeting. As of right now, Southland Construction’s bid is leading in the bidding, and if Council approves, the Design-Build contract will be awarded to them.
If approved on May 9th, the next step would be for the contractor to get a Notice to Proceed issued by FDOT, which, according to the Mayor’s office, usually takes about a month. That puts the beginning of the design period in mid-July, and the process is generally a six-to-nine month process prior to construction starting.  Construction is expected to take about 12-14 months, making 2018 the year when we will be able to pedal over the traffic on Colonial Drive.
For more information on how the bridge will connect the Orlando Urban Trail to Gertrude’s Walk in the downtown core, click HERE.
To see the submitted technical proposals complete with pictures and renderings, scroll down.

Gibbs & Registry bid

Southland bid.

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Brendan O'Connorhttps://www.brendanoconnor.me/
Editor in Chief of Bungalower.com

16 COMMENTS

  1. I clicked on your post to find out where the bridge would be. That seems to have been omitted. Can you share that please ? WWWWWH

  2. Interesting question Mary! We assume it would be involved in the upcoming Ultimate Colonial expansion work. We’ll try to find out.

  3. FDOT is already planning to mill and resurface Colonial from OBT to Shine. As part of that, they are going to remove the planters and parking spaces on West Colonial from OBT to just past Lake Dot Circle and replace them with unprotected bike lanes. However, the I-4 Ultimate team controls anything with I-4 from Lexington to the railroad tracks. So we don’t know what they’re going to do. The I-4 / Colonial intersection is going to look a lot like the 436/17-92 intersection, so it’s a good bet that the area will look like a paved wasteland where no pedestrian or bicyclist would dare to tread. That’s probably why none of the plans presented for the bike flyover provides for direct access to it from or to Colonial. Typical of how engineers and the City have treated South College Park, North Parramore and West Colonial for decades. Instead of seeing it as a gateway to downtown from the West, it’s just another area to be barricaded off with another 4 lanes of interstate and an inaccessible bicycle flyover.

  4. The Creative Village and UCF/Valencia Downtown campus along with South College Park and North Parramore to the West. The numerous apartments and condos of the North Quarter are adjacent to the North. There are plenty of people downtown and in Winter Park and College Park who would love to have a way to access the Urban Trail by foot or bike, but have to stop when they get to Colonial because there is no safe way to cross it.

  5. I prefer Southland’s plans because they include a stairway to access the span directly from Colonial to discourage jay walking at the intersection. I’d prefer an elevator or a switchback ramp system from the street level up to the span, to make it easier for wheelchair and bicycle access if the elevator is cost-prohibitive.

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